• Pruning Climbing Roses

    If you want a Victorian feel in your landscaping, then you should plant beautiful climbing roses. Climbing roses will provide beautiful, and often fragrant, blooms during the summer providing you prune these roses correctly. Pruning climbing roses is easy, but is a slightly different than pruning rose bushes or shrub roses. First, climbing roses should be given time to establish themselves before any hard pruning. Secondly, the time of year that climbing roses should be pruned is important. Finally, when your climbing roses should be pruned will depend on whether your rose plant blooms only once per season or if it is a repeat bloomer.

    Climbing roses should be given time to establish themselves before they are heavily pruned. The long canes that grow vertically and will essentially make up the “climbing” canes need time to grow. Do not prune climbing roses during the first year, and ideally climbing roses should not be pruned the first two or three years after planting. It is more important during this time to “train” young climbing roses than to prune them. Of course, cutting away any dead or damaged limbs is fine to do at any point. If you do decide to prune climbing roses in the first several years, avoid pruning the long limbs that will become the base of the plant.

    It is important to understand what type of climbing rose you have so that you know when to prune. Climbing roses that bloom only once are unlike other classes of rose plants, including other varieties of climbing roses, because they bloom on old or established wood. Climbing roses that bloom on old wood should be pruned in the summer or early fall after the plant has flowered and the blooms have faded. This will ensure the plant has enough time to establish new growth before going dormant in the fall. For climbing and rambling roses, late summer or early fall pruning will mean plenty of established growth for new blooms the following season.

    How to prune climbing roses that are repeat bloomers is a little less complicated than one-time bloomers. Climbing and rambling roses that are repeat-bloomers should be dead-headed frequently to encourage new blooms during the summer. These types of roses bloom on new growth and should be pruned in the spring. To prune climbing roses and rambling roses, simply remove dead or damaged canes, then prune the old growth back to about one-fourth of the plant’s total size. You may also decide to cut back the lateral-growing canes to maintain an appealing shape and to keep the climbing rose within the space you have provided.

    Climbing roses are a beautiful additional to any garden and are relatively easy to prune and care for. After planting, climbing roses should be given at least one year, but ideally three years to establish strong roots before heavilypruning climbing roses. How to prune climbing roses is a bit different than other rose plants, but the most important thing to remember is the time of year your specific climbing rose should be pruned.

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