• Pruning Rose Bushes

    If you want beautiful rose bushes, then you only need to devote a little time once or twice a year to pruning roses for season-long beauty. The technique for pruning roses bushes is almost universally the same. The real differences in pruning rose bushes depends on what type of rose plant you have and how often it blooms each season. If you are unsure, avoid pruning for one year to determine the type of plant and frequency of blooms, then prune accordingly.

    Pruning your rose bushes is vital to appropriate care for your rose garden. Pruning helps to prevent diseases and insect infestation by removing dead or damaged limbs. Pruning promotes air circulation which lessens the risk of major problems later in the growing season. For many types of rose bushes, pruning also helps to promote new growth which is essential for flowering.

    Some types of rose bushes bloom on new growth, as is the case with most Hybrid Tea rose bushes. Roses that bloom on new growth should be pruned in the spring (or late winter, depending on your climate). To prune these types of rose bushes, use a clean, sharp tool and cut just above a new outward facing bud. Remember that pruning these plants will stimulate new growth, so be sure to prune only after the danger of frost has passed.

    Climbing roses and Rambling roses are two specific varieties that primarily bloom on old growth. Cutting away the established canes in the spring will mean you will not have any flowers that season. To prune climbing roses, be sure that the plant is at least one year old, but preferably two or three years old. Cut away any dead, damaged, or diseased canes that would adversely impact the rose plant’s health. Next prune the climbing, or vertical, vines to about 25% of its original size. Lateral growth may also be pruned to keep the climbing plant within the desired boundaries.

    Pruning rose bushes is important in any rose garden, not matter what type of rose plants you have. Your pruning tools should be clean and sharp, and should be washed before pruning another rose bush to prevent the spread of diseases and insects. Knowing whether your roses bloom on new growth or on old growth will ensure appropriate pruning each year. If you are unsure, do not prune your rose bushes for one season to determine what type of rose plants you have, and prune accordingly the following year.

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